Posts Tagged ‘Core Ideology

14
May
11

Be the Guiding Light

Though pretty much everyone wants to be a force for good, few have seriously questioned themselves on what exactly that means. It’s not surprising; figuring out who you are at your core in relation to your business can seem a difficult task.

But, formalizing your core values and beliefs is an essential part of creating a business that is a force for good. When things start moving quickly and decisions need to be made, your core values and vision are your guiding light.

The guiding light you hold consistently presents to the world who you are at your core and that you love this core. It is essential that you lovingly present the core of yourself; otherwise, it will be impossible to ask others to love you and what you are doing.

Take a moment to ask yourself some leading questions about the guiding light of your business. If you’re not in a reflective space right now, you may want to come back to this exercise later when you have some time to put real thought into it. So consider…

What/who is most important to you in the world?

– Why did you choose to get into this particular business?

What values (e.g., trust, honor, love, and hospitality) are most important to you?

– When was the last time you were a powerful influence for good? What elements were involved in that situation?

– In your wildest dreams, what legacy would you like to leave behind?

Use your answers to these questions to establish a brilliant and inspiring core business ideology. It may shift and change, and that’s okay. You will probably rewrite your business ideology multiple times before you settle on a version that seems right to you. Be sure to include what influence you would like your business to have and what values you would like your business to personify…

and Shine On.

Related Posts

Face Your Brilliance

What is a Vision Statement?

Make Love to the World with Your Strategy


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30
Apr
10

What is a Vision Statement?


vision of peace statue

Originally uploaded by Dan Anderson

Martin Luther King, Jr. said, “I have a dream,” and what followed was a vision that changed a nation. That famous speech is a dramatic example of the power that can be generated by a person who communicates a compelling vision of the future.

Management author Tom Peters identified a clear vision of the desired future state of the organization as an essential component of high performance. If a strategic plan is the “blueprint” for an organization’s work, then the vision is the “artist’s rendering” of the achievement of that plan. It is a description in words that conjures up a similar picture for each member of the company of the destination of the company’s work together. There is one universal rule of planning: You will never be greater than the vision that guides you. No Olympic athlete ever got to the Olympics by mistake; a compelling vision of his or her stellar performance inevitably guides all the sweat and tears for many years. The vision statement should require the organization’s members to stretch their expectations, aspirations, and performance. Without that powerful, attractive, valuable vision, why bother?

How a Vision is Used

John Bryson, the author of Strategic Planning for Public and Nonprofit Organizations, states that typically, a vision is “more important as a guide to implementing strategy than it is to formulating it.” This is because the development of strategy is driven by what you are trying to accomplish, your organization’s purposes. A mission statement answers the questions: Why does our organization exist? What business are we in? What values will guide us? A vision, however, is more encompassing. It answers the question, “What will success look like?” It is the pursuit of this image of success that really motivates people to work together.

A vision statement should be realistic and credible, well articulated and easily understood, appropriate, ambitious, and responsive to change. It should orient the company’s energies and serve as a guide to action. It should be consistent with the organization’s values. In short, a vision should challenge and inspire the company to achieve its mission.  Reprinted: Alliance for Management

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Face Your Brilliant Creation

Back to the Core



10
Mar
10

Love sees thousands of markets

 


Albaquoiquie

Originally uploaded by MikeJonesPhoto

The intellect saw a market and started to haggle; Love saw thousands of markets beyond that market. ~ Rumi

One of the programs I deliver, Plan & Let Go, was created several years ago.  I revamped it late last year, balancing it out with what I felt was important from a spiritual perspective and adding the Seven Success Practices of Love-is-the-Bottom-Line.

It took me a while to be in the reality that there was a huge gap in the material regarding Social Media –a gap that could not be ignored.  I set off on a trek to research the subject (and wrote about it here over the course of several weeks).

What began as a simple inquiry, soon proved to be a profound lesson.

While exploring the subject, my MBA self started to get really excited and see the profit opportunity available in this growing realm.  The universe picked up on the excitement and soon a good friend (OK, so she may have been reading my blog) contacted me to see if I would be interested in exploring the possibility of delivering Social Media Consulting.  She had the networks plus an amazing tech consultant to add to the mix –cool.

Over the next three weeks we met, talked and explored.  My ego rapidly took over.  There was good money, good clients and kudos available.  I was so honored to be in the company of these two amazing women, and not wanting to rock the boat, I never once brought up creating our venture from a Love-is-the-Bottom-Line perspective.

I began to wonder if I should stop focusing on my current work. Immediately an anxiety came up that thankfully had me stop, think, touch base with my coach (check her out!) and get back to the core.   The next day was amazing and it all came together.

I had a Plan & Let Go session with a client in the a.m. –we met at the Houston Arboretum – we walked, planned, and picked up stones to anchor it in.  I loved it and practically skipped away — clear I was not giving that up!  Later, knowing I would have to be up-front about where I was at, I met the forming Social Media group in a beautiful Zen condo – we ate chicken salad and watched the most recent PBS Frontline program on Digital_Nation…….we did not know it when we sat down, but the program had a huge focus on the dangers of Social Media.

Once the program was over, I experienced a profound energetic shift and the possibility of “why” we had come together was brought forth.  We sat in silence for a few moments and looked at each other.  Our discussion immediately took a different direction from where we had been headed. We ended up leaving with action items to explore a balanced plugged and unplugged Social Media support group.  A project that would make money AND make a difference for people –a Love-is-the-Bottom-Line project!

That evening, I shared with my husband the events of the day. “He ended up stating the most fundamental question –one everyone should ask themselves – “Is your business / career / project forwarding your spiritual ascension, or is it holding you back in distraction and ego?”

Can you see thru the eye of love into thousands of markets –markets that go beyond immediate tangibility and add to your spiritual ascension?  Can you let go or tweak projects as soon as you recognize a blinding aspect?

Related Posts:

Get Your Social Media Strategy Groove On

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Love-is-the-Bottom Line Seven Success Practices

Programs & Services: Plan & Let Go / Beautiful Walks


22
Jan
10

Disciplines ~ Rumi


The heart

Originally uploaded by Studioaiko ‘s Photo

Do not expect to be always happy on this way.
You have been caught by a lion, my dear.

The friend dumps plaster on your head.
Think of it as expensive perfume.

Inside you there is a monster
that must be tied up and whipped.

Watch the man beating a rug.
He is not mad at it.
He wants to loosen the layers of dirt.

Ego accumulations are not loosened
with one swat. Continual work
is necessary, disciplines.

In dreams, and even awake,
you will hear the beloved screaming at you.

A carpenter saws and chisels a piece of wood,
because he knows how he wants to use it.

Curing a hide, the tanner
rubs in acid and all manner of filth.
This makes a beautiful soft leather.

What does the half-finished hide know?
Every hard thing that happens
works on you like that.

Hurry. Come back
like the sun comes back
every day with new and powerful secrets.

Why Rumi

Related Posts: Plan & Let GoFace Your Brilliant Creation

Seven Success Practices

Programs & Services: Plan & Let Go

19
Jan
10

Face Your Brilliant Creation

We are ourselves creations, and we in turn are meant to design new creations ~Julia Cameron

You must fall in love with yourself, warts and all, if you are going to have anyone else fall in love with what you are creating and offering. Part of falling in love with yourself is understanding and accepting that you are a brilliant center of powerful creation.

Because you are a center of powerful creation, you must also be willing to face the responsibility of your creations. As your business expands and grows, the Core Ideology (mission, vision, and values) ensures that business actions and transactions are in integrity with your original intention. The Core Ideology is, consciously and in co-creation with spirit, determined by you.

The main thrust of core ideology is that it is enduring. Ultimately, Core Ideology provides “higher thinking” and guide posts from which to make decisions ~like a beacon reminding you of what you and your company are all about when things are moving really fast, as well as when things seem dark or confusing. The core remains intact regardless of circumstances (very much like spiritual principles that endure over time, resonate when we hear them, and bring us back to center).  A powerful core ideology will speak to anyone who hears it and supersedes individual personalities.

With your business, you are creating a garden for Divine Source to visit and co-grow. The Core Ideology is the marker, the framework, the boundaries of your particular garden. It states and anchors in that in THIS garden, each and every flower (transaction) will have THIS particular seed of your expression within it. The Ideology trains you to be in the now of the day-to-day business of your business; by trusting the garden you are in — you are free to express joyfully and move into your brilliant power and creation more and more.

Read more about how to face your brilliant creation in the eBook Becoming a Source of Good

Related Posts:

What is a Vision Statement?

Make Love to the World with Your Strategy

Deliver Transformative Products & Services

Infatuate Your Customers

27
Oct
09

The World Needs More Big Hairy Missions

Your loving alertness is a lantern.  Keep it protected from wind that makes it crazy.  Instead of that airy commotion live in the water that gently cools as it flows.  ~ Rumi

In the OCT/NOV issue of Fast Company, Nancy Lublin CEO of Do Something, shares an article about mission statements …..why they are dumb and how to write one. Basically she suggests that using a specific target such as a BHAG aka Big Hairy Audacious Goal (hey! I just blogged about BHAG’s!) as a mission statement is a good idea because it is clear and precise ~ a quantifiable goal everyone can get behind.

I agree with her that companies should take any “wonky mission statement and rip it to shreds” – I don’t agree that mission statements should be BHAG-ish.  Mission statements, an integral component of core ideology, should be enduring – if the environment changes, the statement remains the same. For example, Microsoft’s well-known BHAG, as referenced in the FC article, “a computer on every desk and in every home, all running Microsoft software” is a goal/BHAG, yes – but is this really all the company is up to? As stated on the company website, “at Microsoft, our mission and values are to help people and businesses throughout the world realize their full potential” ~ now that is one Big Hairy Mission ~ one that is enduring, non-limiting and inspiring to most people reading it.  So, let’s keep our BHAG’s distinct and start creating and working from Big Hairy Missions that compel us all to act from our highest selves.

(Lublin is obviously up to some good stuff ~ her company Do Something “uses the power of online to get teens to do good stuff offline” ~ now that is one big hairy commitment!)

 

24
Oct
09

Back to the Core


2 of Force: Ideology
Originally uploaded by Arenamontanus

…Split the sack of your culture…stick your head out…look around…reach up…a voice speaks to your clarity. ~Rumi

When I was in grad school, we spent a lot of time on a popular book called Built to Last: Successful Habits of Visionary Companies (BTL). Published in 1994 by Collins and Porras, the book outlined visionary habits of successful companies. BTL made a strong case for a focus on core ideology (mission, vision, and values) and BHAG’S (Big Hairy Audacious Goals) that go beyond profit.  With the further support of an ongoing body of business literature, the next 15 years of management consulting instilled core ideology and organizational culture development just as strategically necessary as quality products.

The main thrust of core ideology is that it is enduring ~ the eighteen companies on BTL’s “best list” have all been operating for over 100 years with the same ideology intact. Ultimately, core Ideology provides “higher thinking” and guide posts from which to make decisions ~like a beacon reminding you of what you and your company are all about when things seem dark or confusing. The core remains intact regardless of circumstances (very much like spiritual principles that endure over time, resonate when we hear them, and bring us back to center).  A powerful core ideology will speak to anyone who hears it and supersedes individual personalities.

The collective personality of a company is the culture and is distinct from core ideology ~ not separate, but distinct.  The core ideology is operating within the culture, sometimes more obviously than others, but always operating. When things seem “off kilter” and/or the next evolution is necessary, the core is consciously brought to the forefront to smoothly guide the company to the next level.

A strong, effective culture is in love with the ideology, is responsible for it’s growth, and organizes around it. Consciously smart companies understand that supporting the vital connection between culture and core ideology leverages profit and the difference their entity will make in the world.

Read more about Core Ideology in the eBook Becoming a Source of Good

Related Posts:

What is a Vision Statement?

Face Your Brilliant Creation

Lean Your Graceful Plan Towards Spirit

The World Needs More Big Hairy Missions




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