Posts Tagged ‘Brenda Rarey

03
Nov
09

The R.O.I. of Coaching, Consulting & Training


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Originally uploaded by N S R

If any seemingly “intangible service or program” that you are offering or purchasing promises an increase in productivity, customer service, product quality, sales or the like– measure it. If the service or program cannot promise results linked to business performance, reconsider it.

It is important to expose any fantasy related to the application of services such as coaching, consulting, and training.  Clearing out  delusions and examining motivation, supports accountability for both buyer and seller  — ensuring inspirational and truly powerful results.

All programs should produce a demonstrable increase in business performance that exceeds the cost of the program (Results – Cost)/Results = Return on Investment (R.O.I.).

Before the program begins, obtain a baseline number of the performance measures (e.g. productivity, customer satisfaction, employee retention, product quality, or sales). Only track a measure that is clearly linked to the overall success or profitability of the business.

Convert information such as customer and employee satisfaction scores into a dollar amount. Similarly, cost of the program can be translated into a “score.” The goal is to have two like numbers to use in the R.O.I. formula.

Determine how often the measure will be revisited. Immediately following the program and quarterly or semi-annually checkpoints are typically good.

Share and discuss the results to keep the door open for further inquiry into how the program can impact the performance measure.  Maintain effectiveness as the measure of truth.

Considering only the cost of a program is like a viticulturist paying more attention to the bottle than to the wine. When measurable results are integrated into program implementation, the delivery of substance over form is ensured.

This post is a retread of an article written under my non-pen name, Brenda Rarey ~ co-authored with Diana Petrochelli ~ published in the Houston Business Journal.

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27
Jul
09

Five Keys to Measuring Productivity

I wrote an article about this topic several (and I do mean several) years ago published in the Houston Business Journal.  Here are the original Five Keys:

  1. Keep it Balanced – Incorporate both leading measures that drive performance and lagging measures that are outcome, or results-oriented.
  2. Know the Organization – Align productivity objectives with the mission and strategy of the organization.
  3. Establish Credibility – Make sure there is buy-in and keep it simple.
  4. Ensure Integrity – Use measures to track progress against goals or targets, not to create competition among teams, business units or individuals.
  5. Share Results  – Establish who will receive what results when.

The context in which the keys were originally designed — “productivity is an expectation that employees produce output that gives rise to, and forwards, company goals” could be altered to “productivity is the innate ability of every individual to express, produce or give rise to” — period.  From a Shaman’s point-of-view it could be said that the only reason we do anything is to express and connect with other people.  It could be said that business is really a construct for people to do that – express and connect – and only that. From this context, the Five Keys to Measuring Productivity would be:

  1. Keep it Un-Balanced – Incorporate both leading measures that drive performance and lagging measures that are outcome, or results-oriented.  Focus on the leading measure – have more leading measures than lagging, include measures that express expression.  Allow individuals to design their own leading and lagging measures – incorporate them.
  2. Know the Organization / Individual Connection – Align productivity objectives with the mission and strategy of the organization.  Include the mission, vision, and values of individuals involved in the organization.
  3. Nurture Credibility –  Credibility should be nurtured, never established.  Make sure the company keeps it’s word. Make sure there is buy-in to productivity measures, that people are aligned and inspired, and keep it simple.
  4. Ensure Integrity – Don’t have a whole lot of goals or targets, and never design measures that encourage a breach of an individuals ethics, or pit them against one another.
  5. Share the Good and the Bad Results  – Establish who will receive what results when e.g. everyone whenever they want them.

Measures are important…..they set the edges of the garden in which a business can grow.  Measures should never, however, rule us and they should above all, support every individual to view and expand their expression and connection – ultimately creating a profitable bottom-line that everyone can feel good about.

View the original article published under my non-pen name, Brenda Rarey, as “Get all employees on board when dealing with productivity issues” Houston Business Journal






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