Archive for February, 2011

22
Feb
11

7 Basic Social Media Steps

Here is a practical approach to developing a Social Media Strategy for your business:

#1 Understand the Water you are Putting your Toes Into Set up and start working the basics: Twitter, Facebook & LinkedIn. Get comfortable, play with your style and core message. Understand and resist the embedded bias in the technologies you are utilizing. Don’t let the water overwhelm you.

#2 Create a Digital Rolodex of Connections When social media is done correctly, relationships will build naturally. Make sure you have an email gathering function working immediately. These are your future customers. Your opportunity to create intimacy begins immediately. When you are ready to offer something to your connections, your rolodex will be flush. Begin by inviting people you know, then follow people who interest you. Follow conversations, subscribe to blogs that interest you. Make a list of influencers relevant to your business and connect with them on FB, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

#3 Occasionally Educate about your Products and/or Services Yes, occasionally. You don’t want to come across like you are all about promoting yourself. Do start to establish yourself as the go-to in relation to your particular product and/or service by educating. Exhibit that you deserve respect –a necessary ingredient for crossing the boundary between being just a commodity to a valued relationship. Be willing to be educated and share what you learn and who you learned it from. Make sure that links to your website or blog have good information on them so people who want to know more can easily get info.

#4 Create a Game to Play Efficiently systematize how much time and energy you will put into your SM and then have fun with it! Be entertaining AND establish mystery –tell great stories, tap into peoples dreams. Do status updates and tweets based on the image you are holding. This is where you are starting to create leverage with your Social Media.

#5 Hone your Image What is your platform? Now that you have had a little time to play, seriously review your image –what exactly do you want to project about you and your business? Make sure there is CONSISTENCY regarding your formats — begin to establish your brand. Review your basics: Do you need to add any portals? Delete some? Figure out distinctions between personal and biz for both Twitter and Facebook – do you need both? Does it make sense for you to start a group?

#6 Analyze, Adapt, and Improve Metrics You should be able to measure your success. Measures will tie into the goals and objectives of your strategy (more on this at Social Media Examiner).

#7 Focus on Community Radiate love in every Social Media action. Move your brand into the zone of inspiration. Create profound connections between others.

Inspired by Social Media Examiner & Mashable & Seven Key Components

Here is an entertaining video on the Social Media Revolution~ the facts may astound you:

Related Posts: Infatuate Your Customers, Shaman Media Revolution

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16
Feb
11

Happy Speaks Happy:Let Your Customers Speak for You

Gathering testimonials and case histories from happy customers is an easy way to show prospective customers exactly what you can do for them.

If you’ve ever watched the Home Shopping Network or seen an infomercial—and been tempted to buy—then you understand the power of testimonials. Typically there’s an instantaneous increase in the number of sales when real customers are seen or heard testifying as to how beneficial a product or service has been for them. Truth sells—and you can’t get closer to the truth than when it comes from someone who’s had a real-life experience with you, your service and your company. If you’ve got happy customers, you shouldn’t have any trouble getting them to talk about how pleased they are with you.

Case Histories vs. Testimonials So what’s the difference? In a nutshell, testimonials are simply positive statements from your customers. They can range from brief kudos—”These guys saved my job!”—to longer recountings of how the product or company has performed impressively. Remember, the more well-known or networked the testimonial-giver, the more powerful the words and the impact.

In a case history, you tell a story, demonstrating the problem faced by your customers and how your product or service solved the problem.  Good case histories are rich in detail, including explanatory photos, charts and graphs when applicable. They use the real names of the players, and, of course, they end happily.

Gathering Testimonials One of the best ways to get prospective clients to buy from you is to introduce them to other satisfied customers. Ask your most satisfied clients whether you can interview them about the positive experiences they’ve had with your product and company, and record it with a video or digital camera. You can then load the videos onto your site and, with just the click of a mouse, prospective customers can play them back. If you’re ever talking with a client and they give you a great compliment, ask them to put it in writing so you can use it on your site. Received a nice e-mail from a satisfied customer? Ask them if you can put it in the “testimonials” section on your website, or have them add an update status on your Facebook business page.

Drumming Up Case Histories For case histories, keep your eyes and ears open for an interesting, amusing or revealing use of your product or service. When writing them up, remember that each case history should be brief and focused on just one or two of your product or service’s benefits. And don’t make each one sound like all the others. Give them enough character and personality to make them readable, without sounding like a prepared advertisement. Consider collecting case histories as an ongoing project. Every three months, compile a list of client projects that may make interesting case histories.

Finally, remember that the process of collecting testimonials and case histories is also a good way to do on-the-spot market research. You’ll learn a lot by asking for feedback. This also affords you a way of keeping in touch with your existing customers. Just calling for a “testimonial update” is a sure way of staying connected to your clients—and helping them remember just what a great service you have.

Compiled from an article written by Barry Farber Entrepreneur and from Knock-Out Marketing by Jack Ferrari

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Infatuate Your Customers

Deliver Happiness with your Social Media

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11
Feb
11

Poet Post: Joan of Arc by Carol Denson

When I read Ruby’s Eye of the Beholder post, it reminded me of Joan of Arc who acted in accordance with her spiritual vision and led the French to many victories against the occupying English.  If she had only reacted to the material world, she would have known that a 16 year old girl could not influence the course of history.  Instead she acted upon the Divine Guidance of her spiritual vision and created a monumental change in the physical world ~ Carol Denson

Joan of Arc stands in the garden hearing voices call,

but stares away from them, the three angels –

a red-bearded, golden-armored knight,

a flower-wreathed and gauzy-veiled maiden

whose hands are clasped and head canted, gazing

at Joan, and an indistinguishable baby.

Our heroine has risen from a loom,

her stool overturned, her eyes wide

but seeing nothing as she listens into

the space behind her, its unspoken call.

I cry in the Metropolitan Museum

when I come upon this unsuspecting Joan

by Bastien-Lepage.  I’d seen it once

in Paris or Madrid and the circumstance

of finding it again is startling.

Those years ago, heartsick, and now in playful,

happy love, but neither matters, what matters

is the listening and the house behind –

her parents praying for another fate,

their prayers useless against the call.

Follow Carol on Twitter

Why Poetry?

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05
Feb
11

Eye of the Beholder

To paraphrase Marianne Williamson……

Remember you have a physical set of eyes and a spiritual set of eyes.

WIth your physical eyes you see the material world and act accordingly, based on what you see. Typically, this is the set of eyes we use when we plan and take actions in our businesses.

But, as we all know, there is more to life than the material world.

With your spiritual eyes, you can see beyond appearances. Instead of allowing appearances to determine what you think is real and reacting to it, you can decide what is beyond the appearance and calmly continue to invoke what you choose.

This practice permits the real you to come forth. Every time you choose to act from a balanced perspective of both material and spiritual, every time you invoke rather than react, every time you choose love over fear –you get closer and closer to the real you and the real world.

By doing so, you cause a change in what you see.

The real you is not a body at all, but rather a spirit…an energy…an idea in the Mind of God or Divine Spirit. The real you is a being of light, and therefore has no material density.

The real world is simply love. The real world is not dangerous, violent, or chaotic.

As you align more and more with this truth of your being and the world, this higher reality will permeate all aspects of your business,

and your life.

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